• Since its beginnings, the Forensic Anthropology Center has been conducting research that continually pushes the boundaries of what the world knows about human decomposition. Take a look at three research projects that are helping to expand the world’s forensic knowledge.

  • A building lies in ruins, its smoky shell all that remains. As firefighters turn their attention from battling the blaze to figuring out what caused it, their first call goes out to . . . an electrical engineer? It might seem an odd place to start, but when that engineer is UT’s David Icove, it makes perfect sense.

  • A skeleton found in an abandoned house haunted Jennifer Love (’99 & 01) for months. As the forensic anthropologist for Shelby County, Tennessee, it was her job to piece together clues from those bones to figure out who this person was and return the remains to their family.

  • David Hunt (’83 & ’89) remembers visiting the Dickson Mounds State Museum, not far from his home in Washington, Illinois, as early as age six and being fascinated by the skeletons that had been excavated—some of them with arrow points still in them.

  • Jan Parks Cornett (’10) was born paralyzed, but that didn’t stop her from becoming an equestrian and participating in 5ks. Her two role models—Pat Summitt and Peyton Manning—inspired her along the way.

  • French may soon be taught in a new way thanks to a multidisciplinary team of students and professors developing a new app

  • Think you know your university history? Take a crack at the hardest (and most informative) UT quiz you may ever take.